North Yorkshire and York perinatal mental health service

Huntington House

Jockey Lane

Huntington

York

YO32 9XW

 

Telephone: 01904 556 724

Email: tewv.northyorksperinatal@nhs.net

 

What is the perinatal mental health team?

The perinatal community mental health team provides a community service to support women who are experiencing mental health difficulties during pregnancy or in the first year after they have had their baby.

Why do we need a perinatal mental health team?

Mental illnesses affect more than one in ten women during pregnancy and the first year after childbirth.1

During pregnancy and after birth, women can be affected by a range of mental health problems including anxiety disorders, depression and postnatal psychotic disorders.

Some women are at increased risk of experiencing mental illness in the perinatal period, particularly those who have suffered from a severe perinatal mental illness such as postpartum psychosis, severed depression and those with bipolar disorder. 2

 

Who works in the team?

The team is made up of specialist community psychiatric nurses, a consultant psychiatrist a psychologist, an occupational therapist and a specialist nursery nurse as well as our team medical secretary.

 

Who does the team see?

The team supports women living in North Yorkshire and York who are either pregnant or up to one year post-natal and who have been suffering with significant mental health difficulties, that requires specialist support from mental health services.

 

Who can refer me?

You can be referred by your GP, health visitor, midwife or another professional who works with you.

 

What will happen when I am referred?

You will be contacted by a member of the team to arrange a convenient appointment for your assessment. If we are unable to reach you by telephone we may send you an appointment by post. If you do not feel you need this appointment it would be helpful to let us know. Your initial appointment can last up to an hour and is an opportunity for you to discuss your current difficulties. You are welcome to bring a friend, family member or other professional to this appointment if you would find this helpful.

 

How can the team help me?

If we decide that the perinatal service is the best service to support you, you will be allocated to one of the clinicians within the team. They will then work with you to agree a care plan to help meet your individual needs and find solutions to support you on your road to recovery.

 

Will everything I say be kept confidential?

Everything you say, and the information about you will be kept confidential within the perinatal team. The only instance in which we would need to break your confidentially is if it was felt there was a risk to yourself or others, but we would speak to you about this.

Can my family and friends who care for me get help?

If you have an identified carer, we are able to offer them a carer’s assessment.

 

Out of hours support

If you need help outside of the perinatal team’s normal working hours, you can contact the crisis team in your area on the numbers below:

Harrogate: 01423 553778

Northallerton: 01609 763702

Scarborough: 01723 384645

York: 01904 526582

 

References

  1. Prevention in Mind. All Babies Count: Spotlight on Perinatal Mental Health. Sally Hogg, NSPCC 2013
  2. Antenatal and postnatal mental health: clinical management and service guidance (December 2014) NICE guideline 192. National Institute for Clinical Excellence.

 

Leaflet reference: L1038
Version: V1
Date last updated: 07 / February / 2019
Archive date: 07 / February / 2022

The Trust has perinatal services in:

County Durham and Darlington

Teesside

North Yorkshire and York 

Please click on the above links for information about each service.

 

Craglea,
Lanchester Road Hospital,
Lanchester Road,
Durham
DH1 5RD

Tel: 0191 451 0400

What is the perinatal mental health team?

The perinatal community mental health team provides a community service to support women who are experiencing mental health difficulties during pregnancy or in the first year after they have had their baby.

Why do we need a perinatal mental health team?

Mental illnesses affect more than one in ten women during pregnancy and the first year after childbirth. 1

During pregnancy and after birth, women can be affected by a range of mental health problems including anxiety disorders, depression and postnatal psychotic disorders.

Some women are at increased risk of experiencing mental illness in the perinatal period, particularly those who have suffered from a severe perinatal mental illness such as post-partum psychosis, severe depression and those with bipolar disorder.

Who works in the team?

The team is made up of specialist community psychiatric nurses, a consultant psychiatrist, a psychologist, an occupational therapist, a specialist nursery nurse, a peer support worker and administrative staff.

Who does the team see?

The team supports women living in County Durham and Darlington who are either pregnant or up to one year post-natal and who have been suffering with significant mental health difficulties, that requires specialist support from mental health services.

Who can refer me?

You can be referred by your GP, health visitor, midwife or another professional who works with you.

What will happen when I am referred?

You will be contacted by a member of the team to arrange a convenient appointment for your assessment. If we are unable to reach you by telephone we may send you an appointment by post. If you do not feel you need this appointment it would be helpful to let us know.

Your initial appointment can last up to an hour and is an opportunity for you to discuss your current difficulties. You are welcome to bring a friend, family member or other professional to this appointment if you would find this helpful.

How can the team help me?

If we decide that the perinatal service is the best service to support you, you will be allocated to one of the clinicians within the team. They will then work with you to agree a care plan to help meet your individual needs and find solutions to support you on your road to recovery.

Will everything I say be kept confidential?

Everything you say, and the information you provide will be kept confidential within the perinatal team. The only instance in which we would need to break your confidentiality is if it was felt there was a risk to yourself or others, but we would speak to you about this.

Can my family and friends who care for me get help?

If you have an identified carer, we are able to offer them a carer’s assessment.

Out of hours support

If you need help outside of the perinatal team’s normal working hours, you can self-present at the crisis assessment suite at Lanchester Road Hospital, Durham at any time. You can also contact the crisis team on the numbers below:

References

  1. Prevention in Mind. All Babies Count:Spotlight on Perinatal Mental Health. Sally Hogg, NSPCC 2013
  2. Antenatal and post-natal mental health: clinical management and service guidance (December 2014) Nice guideline 192. National Institute for Clinical Excellence

 

Leaflet reference: L1035
Version: V3
Date last updated: 08 / Feb / 2019
Archive date: 08 / Feb / 2022

 

 

 

 

Contact information

If you have any queries about using text messages to communicate please contact your care team.

 

Introduction 

We are committed to providing high quality services. Part of this is making sure we communicate with you in the best way to meet your needs and manage risks. Often this is by telephone or in person.

Verbal communications help us to find out what is happening, assess your level of distress and provide appropriate support.

Text conversations can lack the depth of information we need to respond safely.

Messages that are sent out of office hours may not be responded to in a safe or timely manner. Frequent texts that staff are unable to respond to due to other clinical commitments can also leave you feeling neglected and our staff overwhelmed.

We have developed the following guidance on using text messages based upon work we have done with service users and their experiences.

 

Guidelines

We will discuss any difficulties you may have engaging with services with you.

Please make sure your care team has your mobile telephone number accurately recorded.

We will not assume that because you have given us your mobile phone number that you are consenting to receive text messages.

We will ask your specific consent to use text messages to communicate with you. You can give or withdraw your consent at any time.

 

If you have given consent…

Staff members will text from their work mobile telephone to:

 

Staff members won’t text to:

 

Communicating with us…

Do text:

If you do not receive a response to a text message, please contact your care team via telephone on the number provided at the start of this information.

Don’t text:

 

Changing numbers

If your mobile phone number changes please let your worker know so that they can update the records held by the team.

If your worker changes their mobile number they will let you know their new details.

 

Your care record

We will record whether you have consented to receive text messages on your clinical record.

All text communication will be transcribed onto your care record including:

Once the information has been transcribed the message will be deleted from the worker’s mobile phone.

 

 

Leaflet reference: L1032
Version: V1
Date last updated: 29/01/2019
Archive date: 28/01/2022

 

 

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During your stay on Birch ward, your nutritional plan is one of the most important aspects of treatment. This information has been produced with patients to explain what your meal plan will look like whilst you are staying with us.

What are the meal times on Birch ward

8.30am Breakfast
10.30am Snack
12.30pm Lunch
2.30pm Snack
5pm Evening meal
7pm Additional supper (if needed)
9pm Supper (everyone)
10.30pm Additional supper (if needed)

We ask that you meet in the central area (hub) five minutes before each meal. This will help the meal start on time and makes sure you receive the support you need.

 

Why have I been given a meal plan?

A meal plan provides a structured approach to eating at set times, which is important for people who have eating difficulties.

Your meal plan will:

 

How will my meal plan meet my nutritional needs?

Your meal plan has been designed by the dietetic team to meet your nutritional needs at different stages of your care. This includes:

 

What do the meal plans look like?

Plans are based on four meals and two snacks per day along with nutritious drinks.

There are seven meal plans that have been carefully designed to meet your nutritional needs at different stages of your recovery.

The meal plan stages are identified by the colours of the rainbow (Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Indigo, Violet).

 

What happens if the meal plans don’t meet my individual needs?

If a standard meal plan does not meet your individual nutritional needs a ‘white plan’ may be used for a short time, for example if you are transitioning from a nasogastric tube or you are on a discharge pathway.

 

Will I be able to choose what I want to eat at meal times?

The menus are varied and there are elements of choice. However, choices are limited as when the brain is in starvation it can be very difficult to make decisions and people can feel overwhelmed.

At each meal and snack you will be given a choice of at least two options to provide flexibility and variation.

 

How and when will I choose my meals and snacks?

Menus are designed so you can choose meals and snacks in advance. You will be given a menu card for the meal plan appropriate to your needs each Tuesday.  This will feature a seven day menu.

To complete your menu, please fill in your name and date on each page and put a tick next to your meal and snack choices.

Completed menus should be placed in the menu box no later than 8am on Thursday morning.

The nursing team will provide a copy of your choices to the kitchen and will give one back to you.

Your new menu choices will start on Monday.

Once you move into the activities of daily living (ADL) dining room, the way you choose meals and snacks may change. This will be discussed with you at the time.

 

What happens if I need additional support to complete my menu card?

Please alert staff if you require any additional support to complete your menus.

We can print these in large print or your first language (on request).

 

What happens if I can’t manage my meal or snack?

We will support you and encourage you to finish all of your meals and snacks.

If you are unable to complete a full meal or snack this will need to be replaced with oral nutritional supplement (ONS). This is to make sure your nutritional needs are being met and your physical health is not compromised.

Nursing staff will follow the guidelines below when providing replacement ONS for missed meals and snacks:

Lunch and tea

If you are receiving full portion meals:

If you are receiving half portion meals:

 

Breakfast, supper and snacks

If any amount of the meal or snack is missed, you will be provided with a replacement amount of ONS, equivalent to the full portion of the meal or snack.

 

Frequently asked questions

I am vegan or vegetarian – will I be able to follow this lifestyle choice?
Yes. We have vegetarian options available at each meal. Vegan options are also available following discussion and agreement from your consultant. If possible, please make sure that that Birch ward staff are aware before your admission.

I have a food intolerance or allergy – will you be able to cater for this?
Yes. We can cater for all medically diagnosed food allergies or intolerances. If possible, please make sure Birch ward staff are aware before your admission.

I have looked at the menus and on some days I don’t like any options.
The menus have enough variation to make sure you are able to find a choice you can accept. However, if you feel you are unable to find a choice you can tolerate your dietitian will speak with you about your dislikes and we may be able to adjust your menu choices for your top three genuine dislikes.

What if I don’t choose something from the menu?
A member of the team will support you to make a choice. If you’re unable to do so we will make a choice for you.

My diet plan doesn’t look healthy?
The meal plans have been carefully designed by dietitians to meet your nutritional needs right now. Nutritional needs of a malnourished person are different to the general population. Once you have restored weight and have flexible eating your nutritional needs may change.

I don’t think I can meet my five a day with the menu choices
Achieving five portions of fruit and veg is not a priority at present. Once you become less malnourished then the meal plans will change to include more fruit and vegetables. Fruit and vegetables are available for taste and enjoyment on your meal plan as an addition.

What if I get hungry?
If you are hungry please speak to the team as we can support you to add more in to your diet if it is appropriate.

I’ve written a message to the dietitian or chef on my meal plan or meal card
Your menu cards and meal plan are not the place to write message. If you need to see a member of staff please book an appointment.

 

 

Leaflet reference: L1013
Version: V1
Date last updated: 21/01/2019
Archive date: 20/01/2022

 

 

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Contact information

You can contact the rehabilitation and recovery team using the details below:

Address Huntington House

Jockey Lane

York

YO32 9XW

Telephone 01904 465102
Service opening hours Monday – Friday:

9am – 5pm

Lead contact name Rebecca West, team manager

 

What we do?

The team co-ordinate out of area rehabilitation and recovery placements.

When an out of area hospital placement is being considered, we will meet with you and other professionals involved in your care to discuss:

Together we will consider the options available and come to a joint decision about the best way forward at that time.

We will work with you to develop a care plan to support you on your recovery journey. This will cover:

Suitable mental health interventions will be offered, depending on your individual needs.

We will frequently review your progress to make sure you are moving toward your goals and returning back to living in the community.

If are already in an ‘out of area’ hospital, we will regularly review where you are staying to make sure that your needs are being met and that you are being supported to move on when the time is right.  If you return back to the York and Selby area we will continue to work with you for a limited period to support your transition back into the community.

Some people may not want to return to York and Selby. In these circumstances we will support you to access mental health provision from a team in your chosen area.

Who are we?

Different professionals work in the team and have a range of skills. These include:

Care co-ordinator

You will have a named care co-ordinator. This is someone who is responsible for overseeing the care, interventions and support you are given whilst under our service. Your care co-ordinator will meet frequently with you, but you will also have regular contact with other members of the team.

What we can offer to your relatives, carers, friends and supporters

We will provide support and advice to people in your life who are important to you. We encourage their involvement but equally we will respect your confidentiality and where possible will seek your permission before sharing information with others about you.

How long do people work with the rehabilitation and recovery team?

We will continue to work with you and provide support as long as this is identified as a need. We will discuss this with you throughout our period of involvement.

Useful Contacts

City of York Council: 01904 551550

Citizen Advice Bureau: 03444111444

Patient advice and liaison service (PALS): Free phone 08000520219

MIND: 01904 643364

York and Selby crisis team: 01904 526582

Samaritans: 01904 655888

The Haven: 07483 141310

Mental Health Support Line (24 HRS): this number can be accessed following a referral to the service

NHS non-emergency: 111

Police non-emergency : 101

 

 

 

 

Leaflet reference: L1031
Version: V1
Date last updated: 18/12/2018
Archive date: 17/12/2021

 

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Contact information

You can contact the psychosis and early intervention team in Redcar and Cleveland using the details below:

Address Foxrush House

Green Square

Kirkleatham Business Park

Redcar

TS10 5RS

Telephone 01642 838333 (Reception)
Service opening hours Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm
Out of hours support Crisis team 01642 680706

 

Emergency duty team 08702 402994

 

NHS (non-emergency) 111

 

Contact your own GP

 

In an emergency 999

 

Crisis and recovery suite

Roseberry Park, Middlesbrough Tel. 01642 837340

 

Tees, Esk and Wear Valleys NHS Foundation Trust provides a range of mental health, learning disability and substance misuse services for the 1.3 million people living in County Durham, the Tees Valley and the Scarborough, Whitby and Ryedale areas of North Yorkshire.

Our service users and their carers are at the heart of everything we do and we are continuously developing our services to better meet their individual needs.

We want to make sure that people are able to access the specialist care and treatment they need quickly and as near to their home as possible.

The staff involved in the care of people with mental health needs from health and social care have joined together to form community mental health teams. This includes social workers, community mental health nurses, doctors, occupational therapists, and support workers.

The community mental health team work with people with mental health needs to identify:

This means that anyone who needs the support of health or social care will find they have:

Mission statement

Our aim is to work with service users to work towards recovery from an episode of mental ill health.

 

What happens when you are referred for assessment?

Your first appointment will be with the psychiatrist and the care coordinator to:

You will develop a care plan and risk and relapse management plan with your care coordinator.

During the following 12 weeks you will meet with your care coordinator and support workers to complete a number of specialist assessments. There will be a meeting at the end of the assessments with all those involved in your care to confirm diagnosis, treatment options and what other support you may need.

 

Care co-ordination standards you can expect

You can expect:

 

Who is in the team?

 

Early intervention staff

Early intervention staff are professionals within the team who work with people when they first develop symptoms of psychosis. They will offer intensive support during the first three years of developing symptoms.

 

What to do in a crisis?

Contact the team between 9am and 5pm Monday to Friday and asked for your named worker or the duty worker.

At any other time contact one of the out of hours services listed at the start of this document for support.

 

Our website

For information about our trust services, or general information on conditions and treatments and organisations offering support, please see our website:

http://www.tewv.nhs.uk/patientscarers

 

What if you are not happy with the assessment or the services you receive?

You have a right to complain at any time if:

 

 

 

Leaflet reference: L1017
Version: V1
Date last updated: 13/12/2018
Archive date: 12/12/2021

 

 

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A series of self-help guides are available to view and download, covering the following topics: 

Please visit our online bookshelf to access the self-help guides, which are available as downloadable leaflets.

 

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In the immediate aftermath of a major incident our body’s automatic survival reactions will take over and may react in unexpected ways, e.g. we may freeze, run away, push past others, urinate, have an out of body experience.

Sometimes being nearby, knowing someone there, seeing news images, hearing stories about it or being part of the emergency response is enough to trigger a response in us.

In the first few weeks it may be common to:

 

What can help

 

How to know if you need a GP referral for more specialist help, support or therapy

You may want to approach your GP and seek specialist help and support if you experience any of the below:

 

 

How to support someone you know

Connect: The person may need time to be alone but keep trying to connect with them on everyday activities.

Listen: to their feelings but don’t ask for details of what happened and don’t offer advice.

Ask: Don’t assume what they need, it might be different from what we think.

Practical: Make them a meal, offer them a lift. They may also need some flexibility at work.

 

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Quitting smoking is the single most important way to improve your health and wellbeing. Using smoking cessation medication such as nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) and behavioural support is the best way to quit smoking.

Smoking

Smoking is harmful to our health. It causes cancer, lung disease and heart disease. People with severe mental health problems can die 15 to 25 years earlier than others in the UK. One of the main reasons for this is smoking.1

What are e-cigarettes?

E-cigarettes are battery powered devices that deliver nicotine through inhaled vapour. Most e-cigarettes contain a heating element, a cartridge containing nicotine, glycerine and water. Information regarding the use of individual e-cigarettes is made available by the manufacturers in package inserts.

Some people have found that e-cigarettes help them to cut down and quit smoking but NRT is currently the preferred option, as products such as nicotine patches are a licensed medicine and therefore are safer to use.

Are e-cigarettes safe?

The smoke produced from burning tobacco in cigarettes contains about 4,000 ingredients, 70 of these are known to cause cancer. Since e-cigarettes do not contain tobacco and are not burnt they are thought to be much safer. 2

Can e-cigarettes be prescribed?

No, e-cigarettes are available to buy.

Which types of e-cigarettes can be used and where?

Whilst in hospital we recommend the use of either disposable or rechargeable e-cigarettes and these are available for purchase from our Lloyds Pharmacies within main hospital sites.

Alternatively you can bring in your own e-cigarettes for use but these must be risk assessed by a member of staff prior to use. Please ask a member of ward staff for more details.

Tank models are not allowed for use within the Trust.

You will be able to charge your own e-cigarette so long as you have the appropriate charger. This is because there have previously been some fires caused by e-cigarettes, where an incorrect charger was used, so please ensure you use the charger supplied with your e-cigarette.

Your ward team will best advise you on identified areas where you can use your e-cigarette but the preferred option will be to use an e-cigarette outside in the grounds rather than in the buildings across the Trust.

How do I dispose of used e-cigarettes?

Do not throw your re-chargeable e-cigarettes into a general waste bin. Please give to a member of the ward staff who will safely dispose of it for you as special waste. You can dispose of your disposable e-cigarettes and used cartridges in the general waste bins provided.

Why do Tees, Esk and Wear Valleys NHS Foundation Trust (TEWV) have a smokefree policy?

TEWV staff have been trained to deliver the best treatments for managing nicotine dependence. TEWV patients can benefit from improved general health and wellbeing and may be able to reduce some of their medications.3

Smoking is the biggest preventable cause of early death. It is our duty to promote health and wellbeing. TEWV must comply with the Health Act (2006) and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance on smoking cessation in secondary care (2013).

For more information, please speak to a member of staff on your ward or alternatively contact the national smoke free site on:

Telephone: 0300 123 1044

www.nhs.uk/smokefree

(Schizophrenia Commission, 2012, Tiihonen et al., 2009).

E-cigarettes, An Evidence Update. A Report Commissioned by Public Health England. McNeill A et al. August 2015

(www.choiceandmedication.org). 2015

Leaflet reference: L944
Version: V2
Date last updated: 14 / 03 / 2016
Archive date: 14 / 03 / 2019

 

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